Horses

Horses
The American Paint descended from horses released into the wilds by the Spanish. The Paint is liked by cowboys for cattle work because they are nimble and work hard. American Paints are easy-going, friendly and intelligent. Their coat markings fall into two classes- tobiano (white with dark markings) or overo (dark with light markings).

The adaptability of the quarter horse breed has allowed it to be used in occupations such as ranching and military use. Their coloring varies from bay, black and includes chestnut, palomino, buckskin and grey. The quarter horse breed is known for its small, short and refined head and straight profile as well as its broad chest and powerful hindquarters. Standing between 14 and 16 hands, they are larger, more muscular horses with wide jowls.

The American Saddlebred evolved during the 1800's in the southern States. Originally known as the Kentucky Saddler, this is an intelligent horse with a good disposition, good stamina, and good jumping ability. The Saddlebred is tall, 16-18 hands.

Missouri Fox Trotter: This breed gets its name from its unusual gait where it walks quickly with its forelegs and trots with its hind legs. It can sustain this smooth movement for a long period of time, and is a sure-footed trail horse over rough ground, The Missouri Fox Trotter comes in all colors, but mainly chestnut, and stands at 14-16 hands in height.

The Morgan Horse is the first documented American breed. Morgans are the horse of preference for the United States Army. They are small (12-14 hands) dark horses.

The coloring of the Pinto breed is defined as a dark background color with splashes of white/light colors. During the 1600s in England, horses with colorful spots were shipped to America by the thousands. Many were sold but others were set free to roam the plains.

Mustangs can range in size of between 13 and 16 hands. They roam in vast herds, descendants of the thousands the Spanish released into the wilds in the 1600s.

Load refers to the weight carried in addition to a saddle and rider; this includes weapons on the saddle.

End is endurance, add a white dice to Ride test per point when pushing your mount hard.

Jump is the attribute for agility-type maneuvers such as jumping;add a white dice to Ride test per point.

Heart refers to the inclination to run, as some breeds are more competitive than others, and are more motivated to win a race; add a white dice to Ride test per point.

Cool is the attribute referring to a breeds inclination to stay calm under moments of danger; the number is the attribute dice to be rolled.

Price is average value if saddle-broken and shod, +$25 if accustomed to gunfire, +$5 for cattle-trained.

Individual horses may have better or worse stats based on personal traits and their affection for their rider. Only mares and geldings are ridden; uncut males are too temperamental and distracted.

Draft horses cost $70, a mule costs $30 for each trained ability: pack saddle, draw wagon, rider.

Horses should get a pound of grain for each day in which graze or grazing time is limited. Or when worked hard.

During down time a horse may be trained to obey just heel commands (3 days), come when whistle (2 days), or other appropriate tasks. 

Hand = 4” at the shoulder.

 

<u>Breed</u>

<u>Load</u>

 <u>End</u>

<u>Jump</u>

<u>Heart</u>

 <u>Cool</u>

<u>Price</u>

Paint

40

3

5

4

6

$75

Quarter horse

60

4

4

3

7

$90

Saddlebred

50

4

5

2

5

$85

Missouri Fox

60

4

6

3

4

$90

Morgan

40

5

4

3

7

$90

Pinto

35

4

6

5

6

$85

Mustang

30

3

5

6

5

$75

Horses

Mexico: 1889 Bud Bud